The Main Catalyst

BASF cements location for new HQ

BASF’s Catalysts division President Kenneth Lane (right) and Woodbridge, NJ, Mayor John McCormac visit the Catalysts business’ new global headquarters facility in Iselin, where relocation activities will begin in December 2015.

BASF’s Catalysts division President Kenneth Lane (right) and Woodbridge, NJ, Mayor John McCormac visit the Catalysts business’ new global headquarters facility in Iselin, where relocation activities will begin in December 2015.

BASF, the chemical production company, has locked down a home for the global headquarters of its Catalysts division.

The new facility will be located on a 60,000-square-foot site at 33 Wood Avenue in Iselin, New Jersey. Iselin is in Woodbridge Township, situated due west of Staten Island in the North Jersey metro area. BASF has maintained a presence in the area for 45 years, with two other properties in Iselin. One of these will be retained for future development, while the previously leased 101 Wood Ave. location will now be vacated.

The relocation process begins in December, and the new home is projected to accommodate 240 employees and include three floors and a visitors’ welcome area.

The Catalysts division, organized in 2006, involves the use of metal elements to produce compounds. Chemically speaking, a catalyst accelerates the rate of a reaction by interacting with reactants and products. The catalyst is not consumed during the reaction. The correct catalyst is also highly selective by favoring the desired product over undesirable ones. For example, with an element such as Platinum (symbol Pt, atomic #78, atomic weight 195.08 if you don’t keep a periodic table on you) as the catalyst, nitric oxide and hydrogen can be combined for a reaction that forms ammonia and water. BASF’s website states that “catalysts play a crucial role in 90% of all commercially produced chemical products.”

This type of science is the keystone of the German-based company, which was founded in 1865. The Catalysts division tree includes the production of adsorbents. These are essentially a parallel to absorbents; materials that create a thin adhesive against their surrounding liquids or gases to help soak them in. Such materials are used industrially in a wide range of applications, such as purification, separation, drying, spill management, catalysis and pollution control across a large number of industrial sectors. They are frequently used to control and prevent spillage of oil and guard against corrosion. An example of an adsorbent is silica gel, often found in the food service industry as a method of dry preservation. The rest of the Catalysts division is rounded out by branches of: aircraft/confined space air quality, battery materials, emissions catalysts, business development, precious metals services, process catalysts, and temperature sensing.

“We are delighted to maintain our global headquarters in Iselin, where our Catalysts team has delivered countless innovations and driven strong business growth for many years,” said Catalysts division President Kenneth Lane in a press release on October 14th. “We are proud to call Iselin our home, and look forward to bringing our entire headquarters team together again in a single office environment while maintaining close proximity to our existing local R&D operations and team.”

Advertisements

No comments yet... Be the first to leave a reply!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: